Gungaderra Homestead Redevelopment, Harrison

  • Gungaderra Homestead Redevelopment, Harrison
  • Gungaderra Homestead Redevelopment, Harrison
  • Gungaderra Homestead Redevelopment, Harrison
  • Gungaderra Homestead Redevelopment, Harrison
  • Gungaderra Homestead Redevelopment, Harrison
  • Gungaderra Homestead Redevelopment, Harrison
  • AMC-Retirement, Aged Care+Community-Gungaderra Homestead Redevelopment, Harrison

About the Project

Client:     CHC Affordable Housing
Size:     4,161m²
Cost:     $6.8M
Date:     2009

The 2009 Social Housing Initiative funded by the Commonwealth of Australia under the Economic Stimulus Package provided suitable providers with a rare opportunity to take advantage of significant funding. CHC Affordable Housing, a not for profit affordable housing provider, saw the opportunity and commissioned AMC to develop initial masterplan feasibilities to support an application for funding which was ultimately successful. The site included a number of challenging constraints including heritage listed buildings and landscape elements, but which ultimately have given the development character and meaning. The redevelopment of Gungaderra Homestead was completed in March 2011 and includes the adaptive reuse and extension of the main house as a Community Centre and attractive central hub to the development, the adaptive reuse of the machinery shed as a Men’s Shed and the construction of some 29 new townhouses designed to comply with AS 4299 and Universal Housing Standards sitting respectfully in this interesting and indeed beautiful heritage precinct.

Features of the final design concept include expansive views to the Homestead building from Mapleton Avenue and Sapling Street, the main address to the development. Most of the original Gungaderra Homestead features have been preserved including a generous landscape setting / “around the Main Homestead building and the Machinery Shed. Three basic dwellings have been adopted across the site each of which were planned to ensure that their form was subservient to the original buildings, that the development had interest and variety while always benefiting from excellent northern solar access.

Many of the original trees on the site have been retained, however a rolling program of tree replacement seeks to deal with the inevitable decline of what are very old specimens. Interpretive signs have also been installed in the common landscaped areas to tell the story of this significant part of Canberra’s history including the Winter family and their innovative mechanical farm practices. This attractive and interesting project was the recipient of the Sustainable Cities – Sustainable Buildings & Gardens Residential Award in 2011

See more of our Retirement, Aged Care + Community projects.